how to lose weight fast and safe


How to Lose Weight Fast and Safely

New York City, NY — (SBWIRE) — 09/03/2012 — For those who wish to lose weight, the quest to lose those extra pounds leads them to every new avenue and option that comes along. There are a number of new ways that are hitting the market at very regular intervals, and it can become very confusing for a person to try to sort out these options and find out which is the best choice for them. For those who are looking out for tips on how to lose weight fast and safely, there are many choices to be made and these choices can determine the effectiveness of the options chosen as well as how safe they are.

Over the course of time, there have been a number of diets, tips, solutions and even medication that have been launched into the market, claiming to be extremely effective in helping one to lose weight. While some of these are believed to have worked for some people, there are still many others who attest to the fact that they have spent a great deal of money and time on new options that have been introduced for weight loss, only to have little or no results. Finding the right options on how to lose weight fast and safely is important and care needs to be taken in order to ensure that the methods chosen are truly trustworthy.

For those who are looking out for sure ways in which to lose weight in safe as well as effective ways, the eBook “How to Lose Weight Quickly and Safely” will be a boon indeed. This book lists out the best and safest ways with which to lose weight, and it also takes a candid look at some of the popular weight loss options and diets that are going on these days. With some of the best points on weight loss highlighted, this eBook gives practical and workable methods with which one can lose weight fast, without jeopardizing their health. It incorporates not just options to lose weight fast, such as exercise, yoga and food plans, but it also includes points on how one can make lifestyle changes that can lead to weight loss that lasts and is stable.

“How to Lose Weight Quickly and Safely” is not just a bunch of technical information that cannot be understood. On the other hand, the well-documented data provided is easy for everyone to understand and this makes the material in it even more effective. It is now possible to achieve weight loss without draining one’s resources and time and ending up frustrated.

About “How to Lose Weight Quickly and Safely”“How to Lose Weight Quickly and Safely” offers expert advice on ways in which one can lose weight fast and safely, as the very title suggests. Following the suggestions in this eBook has led to many people finding lasting solutions to their obesity problems and have improved their health on the whole.

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Want to lose weight? LSU has a new drink for you

Olivia McClure, Special to the NNews-StarPublished 3:30 p.m. CT Dec. 8, 2017

When it comes to the effects of diets, it’s all about your genetic makeup. That’s according to a new study released by the Genetics Society of America. Buzz60

The team from two LSU institutions who worked together to make a milk-based meal replacement drink is photographed in a metabolic kitchen at the Pennington Biomedical Research Center on Dec. 5, 2017. From left, front row, LSU food science graduate students Pitchayapat Chonpracha and Valentina Rosasco Silva, who hold samples of the drink, which comes in vanilla and chocolate flavors. Back row, Pennington Biomedical professor and chief medical officer Frank Greenway, AgCenter Food Incubator director Gaye Sandoz and AgCenter food technologist Ashley Gutierrez.(Photo: Olivia McClure)

A milk-based meal replacement drink powder developed by researchers from two LSU institutions could help people safely lose weight, including those who normally cannot drink milk because of digestive issues.

The drink mix is made from a2 Milk, which contains a protein that makes it easier to digest than regular milk. It is the first in a series of consumer products that AgCenter Food Incubator and Pennington Biomedical Research Center scientists hope to develop together.

“This was an initial, and successful, effort toward the larger goal of product development between Pennington and the AgCenter,” said David Winwood, associate executive director for business development at Pennington Biomedical. “We have a collective vision for Pennington- and AgCenter-branded products that help to meet the goals of LSU’s strategic plan and improve the health and wellness of Louisianans and others.”

The team has produced chocolate and vanilla flavors of the drink powder as well as a candy supplement. They plan to offer the products to participants of upcoming Pennington Biomedical clinical trials focused on obesity and linked ailments such as diabetes, which are major problems in Louisiana.

Commercialization is being explored, with incubator director Gaye Sandoz looking into packaging and marketing options.

Studies have shown that drinking meal replacement shakes in lieu of meals for 12 weeks is an effective, safe way to lose weight, said Frank Greenway, a Pennington Biomedical professor working on the project. A few types of shakes are on the market, and most contain a few hundred calories per serving.

LSU AgCenter food technologist Ashley Gutierrez pours

LSU AgCenter food technologist Ashley Gutierrez pours a milk-based meal replacement drink powder into a shaker bottle during a visit to a metabolic kitchen at the Pennington Biomedical Research Center on Dec. 5, 2017. The meal replacement drink is the result of a partnership between the LSU AgCenter Food Incubator and Pennington Biomedical. AgCenter Food Incubator director Gaye Sandoz and Pennington Biomedical professor Frank Greenway talk in background at right. (Photo: Olivia McClure)

Some scientists have suggested milk as a basis for that kind of dieting program.

“Milk is something that mothers give to babies, and that’s their whole diet basically,” said Greenway, who also is Pennington Biomedical’s chief medical officer.

But not everyone can drink the cows’ milk that is sold at grocery stores. It can sicken people whose bodies respond negatively to the way a protein called A1 is digested. Symptoms mimic those felt when a lactose intolerant person drinks milk.

Beta casein is the name of the protein found in milk, and there are two types: A1 and A2.

“A2 was the only type until about 10,000 years ago,” Greenway said. “Then a dairy cow had a mutation that substituted one amino acid for another. That protein is called A1.”

The A1 and A2 proteins break down differently. As A1 is digested, a substance similar to an opioid is produced, sometimes causing ill effects. Greenway said those symptoms are more prevalent among people of African and Han Chinese descent.

At milking time on dairy farms, cows typically are not separated by which type of beta casein protein they make.

“Probably 60 percent of cows have A2 and 40 percent have A1,” Greenway said. “But all of the milk that’s in our grocery stores that you’re going to buy and drink has A1 in it.”

A New Zealand company that only milks cows with A2 protein sells that product under the brand name of a2 Milk. The company donated milk to Pennington Biomedical for the meal replacement drink project, Greenway said.

LSU food science graduate students Pitchayapat Chonpracha,

LSU food science graduate students Pitchayapat Chonpracha, left, Valentina Rosasco Silva, right, pour samples of a milk-based meal replacement drink into small cups during a visit to a metabolic kitchen at the Pennington Biomedical Research Center on Dec. 5, 2017. The meal replacement drink is the result of a partnership between the LSU AgCenter Food Incubator and Pennington Biomedical. Frank Greenway, a Pennington Biomedical professor working on the project, is in the background at right. (Photo: Olivia McClure)

Ashley Gutierrez, a food technologist with the AgCenter Food Incubator, and School of Nutrition and Food Sciences graduate students Pitchayapat Chonpracha and Valentina Rosasco Silva formulated two flavors of drink mix powders from the milk. They then used the powders to make a candy meant to be eaten as a supplement to the meal replacement shake-based diet.

The powders make use of the milk in its entirety, Greenway said, unlike some products that include just the whey.

Pennington Biomedical researchers specified how many calories and how much fat they wanted each of the products to contain.

Usually, Gutierrez said, the incubator scientists work with small food entrepreneurs to adjust home recipes so they are suitable for commercial production. Nutrition information is calculated at the end of that process.

“What was cool about this project is that we worked backwards to develop these products based on their nutritional requirements,” Gutierrez said.

The meal replacement drink is the result of a promising new venture involving two of LSU’s nine campuses, said Louise Wicker, director of the AgCenter School of Nutrition and Food Sciences.

“The collaboration between Pennington Biomedical and the AgCenter is a natural fit for food products,” Wicker said. “Translating Pennington’s research into products using the AgCenter’s expertise in the Food Incubator will help meet needs in Louisiana for foods that have health benefits. The meal replacement product is the first, but we envision innovative snack foods, prepared meals and foods for athletic performance advancing past traditional supplements.”

LSU AgCenter food technologist Ashley Gutierrez, second

LSU AgCenter food technologist Ashley Gutierrez, second from left, talks with Pennington Biomedical Research Center professor Frank Greenway, center, and AgCenter Food Incubator director Gaye Sandoz, right, during a visit to a metabolic kitchen at the Pennington Biomedical on Dec. 5, 2017. They are among a team from the AgCenter and Pennington that worked together to make a milk-based meal replacement drink. LSU food science graduate student Valentina Rosasco Silva samples the drink at left. (Photo: Olivia McClure)

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How to Lose Weight with Running

Will running actually help you achieve your weight-loss goals, and how much running do you need? Here are some answers to common beginner questions about running and weight loss.

So you’ve decided to take on a running program. Before you start, it’s important to figure out your source of motivation. Most beginners start running to lose weight or get in shape. If one or both of these are your objectives, you’re in good company. But will running actually help you achieve your weight-loss goals, and how much running do you need? Here are some answers to common beginner questions about running and weight loss.

More: Active Gear Scout: 10 Essentials for Rookie Runners

Will I Lose Weight?

If you’ve decided to take up running to shed a few pounds, you’re not alone. While there are countless benefits to running, weight loss can be a bonus side effect.

Many runners want to know how much weight they can lose and if the pounds will simply melt off once they start logging miles.

While running can help you burn calories and slim down, patience is a virtue. You may shed some pounds initially—especially if you were previously sedentary—substantial weight loss requires sound nutrition and a balanced diet.

“Running can be a great way to improve your fitness,” says Road Runners Club of America-certified coach Kim Lovejoy. “But you’ll only lose weight if the amount of calories you’re eating is less than the number of calories you’re expending through activity.”

Rather than drastically slashing your calories, remember that you may feel hungrier as a result of your increased activity level, and it’s important to eat enough food to fuel your workouts. To be safe, you may want to consult a nutritionist or health professional to make sure you lose weight gradually without sacrificing your health.

Do I Need to Lose Weight Before I Can Start Running?

Some people think that they can’t start a running program until they lose a certain amount of weight. The truth is, this all depends on the individual.

While it’s important to listen to your body and not overextend yourself, you can find a program that works for you, regardless of your current fitness level.

“Running is going to be more strenuous on your joints, heart, and lungs initially if you have a lot of weight to lose,” says Ron Bowman, an RRCA-certified running coach. “A smart way to start running if you’re worried is through a run/walk program. Consult your doctor or health professional before beginning any type of exercise program if you feel a reason to be concerned.”

More: How to Execute a Run/Walk Program Properly

How Many Calories Does Running Burn?

Want to know how many calories you’re burning every time you head outside or hit the treadmill? The amount of calories burned varies from one individual to the next.

“Calories burned while running is mainly determined by body weight,” says Emily Brown, a former professional runner, registered dietician, and nutritionist for RunnersConnect.net. “On average, you burn 0.63 times your body weight (in pounds) per mile.”

While this formula will give you a ballpark figure, the calorie burn can be increased or decreased depending on your intensity level. As you become a more consistent runner, you may need to tweak your training to continue reaping the same weight-loss benefits.

“You can burn more calories by running faster or longer,” Brown says. “As you become more fit, your body becomes more efficient at running, which means you’ll burn fewer calories doing the same workout. You can keep the calorie burn up by mixing up your workouts and challenging yourself in different ways; for example, running up hills or doing interval workouts.”

More: How to Burn Calories Fast With Interval Training Workouts

Does Fasting Before Running Burn More Calories?

You may have heard that fasting before pounding the pavement or hitting the treadmill is the way to go. Before you skip your pre-run meal, however, let’s break down how fuel is burned during a run.

First, you need to understand the type of fuel (carbohydrate, fat or protein) your body uses during a workout. According to Brown, this depends on your exercise intensity. For low-intensity workouts (think slower runs), the primary fuel source is fat, while higher-intensity workouts (hill repeats, tempo runs, interval training,) use more carbohydrates for fuel.

Fasting before a run affects the type of fuel you use during your workout, and while this may seem like a great way to lose weight quickly, this isn’t necessarily the case.

“When carbohydrates aren’t readily available (due to fasting), the body will use a higher amount of body fat as fuel,” Brown says. “This doesn’t mean you’ll burn more total calories. In fact, it could be argued that you’ll burn less because you may not be able to run as far or as fast as you could if you had fueled before the run.”

As a beginner, it’s more important to determine what type of pre-run meal or snack works for you. Try a couple different things and stick with what works best.

The Bottom Line

When you’re starting out, try not to focus all of your energy on weight loss and how many calories you’re burning each time you head out for a run. While you’ll notice some physical benefits when training, weight loss can be a slow and gradual process. It’s important not to get discouraged.

Remember that by starting a running program, you’re investing in your health and improving your fitness. Make sure you acknowledge your accomplishments, even the little ones.

It’s not always easy to start a new sport or stick to a goal. So congratulate yourself for how far you’ve come, then lace up, get out there, and keep getting after it.

More: How Often Should Beginners Run?

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